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There are 5 talks accompanying this fantastic exhibition. The 5th talk is on Saturday 25th September from 5-6pm All welcome!

The talks are Zoom webinars but the (free) tickets are bookable through Eventbrite. All of them are here – 

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/peacock-visual-arts-17459321692

Is Another Aberdeen Possible?

Join University of Aberdeen Archivist, Andrew MacGregor, former members of Aberdeen People’s Press alongside Doug Haywood and Fiona Napier from Aberdeen Social Centre to discuss the past, present and future of social movements in the city.

There are 5 talks accompanying this fantastic exhibition. The 4th talk is on Tuesday 14th September from 5-6pm by founder member Alan Marshall. All welcome!

The talks are Zoom webinars but the (free) tickets are bookable through Eventbrite. All of them are here – 

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/peacock-visual-arts-17459321692

Aberdeen People’s Press, community newspapers and the end of printers’ monopoly over print

People’s Press was part of a nationwide movement to appropriate not only the means of production of print media (printing), but also the ways in which news priorities were defined and determined on a local level (journalism). Its aim was to circumvent the filters which had for so long allowed the mainstream commercial press to define what was considered to be legitimate news by marginalising all forms of grass-roots dissent. Alan Marshall will talk about the broad technological context of the emergence of the radical press movement and the activities of Aberdeen People’s Press.

There are 5 talks accompanying this fantastic exhibition. The 3rd talk is on Thursday (26th August, 5-6pm) by former members Ian Baird and Andy Rigby. All welcome!

The talks are Zoom webinars but the (free) tickets are bookable through Eventbrite. All of them are here – 

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/peacock-visual-arts-17459321692

Diggers & Dreamers, pre-figuring the future

In the 1970s we were dreaming of a different kind of social order, permeated by human values and concerns that privileged the ‘commonweal’ as against the drive to private power and profit. At Aberdeen People’s Press we were ‘digging’, in the sense of working practically, to sow the seeds of that new (utopian) vision.

Turning to the present – we have the sense that the main driver of activism for change is the determination to avert the worst kind of dystopia, the collapse of our common home (climate crisis), and the struggle to reclaim welfare rights and human dignity that has affected so many in the years of austerity.

Andy Rigby and Ian Baird will be in conversation, asking the questions: Has there been a loss of vision? If so, does it matter?

As part of the Aberdeen People’s Press exhibition, Peacock Visual Arts, are inviting local activists to work with them to create posters for local campaigns. Please see more information below – and get along!!

Come and make a poster for your campaign for FREE.

Use a combination of Risograph printer & Letterpress to create visually striking posters.

From now until 25th September and by appointment only: Thursday – Saturday

You can produce up to ten posters free of charge, in relation to your community’s campaign. We can accommodate groups of up to 6 people. For more details and for booking please email neil@peacock.studio

Notice of a new exhibition curated by Fertile Ground Arts. CRUDE is an exhibition exploring the complex relationship to crude oil, focussing on the interplays of politics, culture and ecology, through newly commissioned works from artists and writers. The exhibition aims to take a critical lens to oil in local, national and international contexts. The exhibition features scans from ‘Oil Over Troubled Waters: a report and critique of oil developments in north-east Scotland’ published by Aberdeen People’s Press and also scans from ‘Blowout’, the rank and file workers’ newsletter of the Offshore Industry Liaison Committee.

Duration: 27th August – 12th September 2021

Opening night Friday 27th August 6-7.30pm

Opening hours: Sat/Sun: 11-5pm. Wed: 12-5pm. Thurs: 5-8pm. Fri: 12-5pm

Location: Look Again project space, 32 St Andrew Street, Aberdeen

Full details on the website and on social media:

https://www.fertileground.info/

https://www.facebook.com/fertilegroundarts

There are 5 talks accompanying this fantastic exhibition. The 2nd talk is on Tuesday (10th August, 5-6pm) by former member Dave Francis. All welcome!

The talks are Zoom webinars but the (free) tickets are bookable through Eventbrite. All of them are here – 

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/peacock-visual-arts-17459321692

One does not compromise with a society in decay

Is a true counter-culture likely to burst fully-formed through the carapace of the dominant culture? If it is not possible to exist entirely unconnected to the dominant culture, the question then arises of the degree of compromise necessary for continued activity and the extent to which the ethos and practices of the counter-culture can be brought to bear on the world in which it operates.Since the 70s a whole apparatus has arisen within the state in Scotland for the promotion of ways of working that would not have been unfamiliar to the counter-culture of that time: social enterprise, community ownership, co-operatives. David Francis will reflect on how much of that is a genuine challenge to a society where concentration of wealth and inequality are growing, and how much an example of the process of ‘recuperation’ foreseen by thinkers like Guy Debord, whereby socially and politically radical ideas are incorporated back into ‘mainstream’ society?

(Aberdeen People’s Press/Boomtown Books shop, King Street, Aberdeen, late 1970s. Image (c)Margaret Lochrie)

Aberdeen Trades Union Council annual report for 2020 is now out!

https://aberdeentuc.blogspot.com/p/agm-2014.html

Features reports by Aberdeen & District CND, Aberdeen Social Centre and Aberdeen Scottish Palestinian Solidarity Campaign.

Due to current restrictions, it has just been issued on the web – note: digitised copies are available on the website from 2015 onwards. Older reports are held at the University of Aberdeen and Aberdeen City Local Studies Library.

Like political graphics? Get along to The Green/Carnegie’s Brae then!

There are some fantastic images there and some harking back (I spied Black Dwarf, David Cameron, Theresa May, Brexit etc.).

For more information see – https://www.flyingleaps.co.uk/

There are 5 talks accompanying this fantastic exhibition. The 1st talk is on Sunday (1st August) by founder member Margaret Lochrie. All welcome!

The talks are Zoom webinars but the (free) tickets are bookable through Eventbrite. All of them are here – 

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/peacock-visual-arts-17459321692

Action must be a creation, not a reaction

The direct action of the 1970’s differed from the protest movements which went before. It called out inequalities of power and wealth but, more than this, created new organisations based on an alternative vision and values. The Aberdeen People’s Press was one example of this, providing a voice for communities, for the homeless, the unemployed and against developers, profiteering landlords and unfeeling bureaucracies.

Another was the Women’s Liberation Movement. Arising out of the inequality women faced at that time, it developed theses on women’s health, history and psychology which both supported women and were absorbed into mainstream culture. The People’s Party (later the Green Party) was formed with sustainability and the ecology of the planet at the heart of its manifesto. Teachers and parents created free schools. Others cultivated smallholdings, based on common ownership and natural farming methods. Echoes of these and similar actions can be found in modern-day movements such as Reclaim the Streets or Extinction Rebellion.

Margaret Lochrie will talk about the link between the personal and political and how in the 1970’s new concepts came into the political sphere –the objectification of women and the ownership of their bodies; the commodification of children; the politics of experience as articulated by the anti-psychiatry movement; and the plundering of the natural environment, amongst others.

Aberdeen People’s Press/Boomtown Books shop, King Street, Aberdeen, late 1970s. Image (c)Margaret Lochrie

Think nothing ever happened in the Granite City? Think again!

The exhibition Another world is possible: Aberdeen People’s Press and radical media in the 1970s is now on. For more information about APP, please see previous blog post – https://aberdeenprotest.wordpress.com/2014/09/07/aberdeen-peoples-press-fl-1973-early-1980s/

Dates: 16 July – 25 Sept 2021⁠

Times: Thursday – Saturday, 12:00 to 17:00

⁠Location: The worm, 11 Castle Street (Castlegate), AB11 5BQ

⁠For more details on the exhibition and Aberdeen People’s Press see here – https://worm.gallery/showing/another-world-is-possible

For up to date information including a series of talk that will accompany the exhibition, see the Peacock Visual Arts Facebook site – http://www.facebook.com/peacockvisualarts/

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